August 18, 2012. Montreal, Que. – Jarrad Whissell toughed out the NAPA Autopro 100 at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve on Saturday after minor contact set him back a few laps early on in the race.

Whissell and his team had a few issues with the #44 SMS Equipment/Komatsu Chevrolet early in practice. They worked quickly to overcome problems with handling, back shock and an oil leak before the qualifying laps. Despite repairs hindering practice laps, Whissell was still the fastest in his qualifying group, earning him the 19th starting position.

Once the race kicked off Whissell felt the car was strong and was settling in to working his way through the field.  He had a good battle with the 42, swapping positions a couple of times.  Then he made a move to pass the 21 into corner 7, the two cars bumped and Whissell ended up with a bent tierod that required a trip to pit lane to repair.  “We didn’t hit very hard, but ended up bending the tie rod and the car was tough to handle. I just couldn’t drive it like that,” Whissell explained. “It is too bad, I thought the car was handling well and if we picked our way through the field we had a top 10 car.”

The pit stop cost #44 and his team three laps.

After shaking off the trouble in lap 4, Whissell soldiered on and showed good pace. Towards the end of the race a couple of cautions were called, giving #44 a free pass which he hoped would get him back on track with the lead lap. Those efforts should garner Whissell the Vtech Free pass contingency award for the event.

Despite showing good speed after recovering, Whissell fell short of regaining the lost ground and concluded the NAPA Autopro 100 in 27th place.

“The car wasn’t great at the end but it was driveable,” Whissell said after the race. “I thought we’d be able to compete for a decent finish if we were able to get that lap back.”

Whissell is hoping to compete again this year in final event at Kawartha Speedway in Fraserville, Ontario.

Follow the progress of the team and help support the Children’s Miracle Network through the team website www.jarradwhissell.com  You can also support the Children’s Miracle Network by Following Whissell on Twitter or liking Whissell Motorsports on Facebook.  The team will donate $1 for each twitter follower and Facebook like they receive between now and December 2012.  The donation will max out at half of the price money Whissell receives this Season in the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series. Follow Jarrad on twitter, @JarradWhissell and like them on Facebook, Whissell Motorsports. Fans can watch all of the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series races again this year on TSN.

 

August 5, 2012. Trois-Rivieres, QUE – When it rains, it pours for Jason White. After waiting out a two-hour rain delay that nearly halted theJuliaWine.com 100 on Sunday at the Circuit de Trois-Rivieres, #21 endured a host of mechanical problems behind the wheel of his Bowers and Wilkins Dodge that stole his hopes for a top-ten finish.

Jason White and his crew ran into mechanical problems early on during Saturday’s practice, which teammate DJ Kennington diagnosed as gear and clutch issues after taking a lap behind the wheel of White’s Bowers & Wilkins Dodge. #21’s crew worked quickly to correct the problems before qualifying, but left White with very little seat time. He ended up qualifying 21st for Sunday’s main event.

The next day as the drivers filled the field for the race; a thunderstorm rolled in and put a red light on the race just as the cars fired their engines. Vehicles sat two hours on the pit road before the JuliaWine.com 100 resumed.

Jason White kicked off the delayed race with skill and poise, with the gear and clutch issues successfully resolved by his crew. #21 navigated his way into the top ten and cruised through a majority of the race, moving he steadily forward in the field.

“The car was so good, what a great race car we had,” White said after the race. “It was a lot of fun to drive.”

However the fun was cut short as the Bower and Wilkins Dodge started to lose power, slowing White down and hindering his progress.

“It just didn’t have the same drive,” he said. “I was worried something was wrong.”

The loss of power in his vehicle hurt #21 significantly, as he chugged along for the remainder of the race only to lose all the laps he gained and ultimately finish right where he started: 21st place.

White and his crew aren’t exactly sure of the issue that caused the power failure, but plan to overhaul the electrical and mechanical systems before the next race in Montreal.

Despite the disappointing end to Sunday, White still managed to find the silver lining: “Good news is we’ve got a fast car and we’ll be strong at the next event.”

Jason White and the #21 Dodge team will compete in the entire 2012 NCATS schedule that will take the team from coast to coast in Canada for the 12 events.  Next on the schedule teams will head to Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal as part of the Nationwide weekend event.  For the latest news about Jason White and the #21 Dodge team check out the team website at www.jasonwhiteracing.com and be sure to follow Jason on twitter for the latest updates @racinjasonwhite  You can get more information about the NCATS series atwww.hometracks.nascar.com

August 5, 2012. Trois-Rivieres, Que. – David Thorndyke made a satisfying comeback to the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series on Sunday at Grand Prix de Trois-Rivieres for the first time since the opening race of the season.

With lots of time to prepare since their last outing, David Thorndyke and his crew felt confident and ready for the JuliaWine.com 100 on Sunday. Despite qualifying 29th after Saturday’s practice sessions behind the wheel of their Thorsons EVT Chevrolet, the team was focused on having a solid car to race, not necessarily the fastest.

“I wasn’t worried about our time,” Thorndyke explained. “I knew the car felt good and would race well.”

However the main event on Sunday suffered a setback as a lengthy rainstorm rolled in before the race could get underway. After waiting out the inclement weather on the pit road for two hours, the drivers finally lined back up on the field and fired up their engines.

But for Thorndyke and his team, the heavy rain was worrisome.

“I wasn’t sure how the car would handle with the rain tires,” #67 said. “I decided to take it easy at first.”

As Thorndyke navigated with caution, the Thorsons EVT Chevrolet held strong and he was able to work his way forward in the field.

“The car did whatever I wanted it to, I just had to adjust a little bit but the car worked really well,” Thorndyke said afterwards.

#67 steadily collected spots as the laps elapsed and eventually finished 20th, up six spots from his qualifying start.

“I’m really satisfied with our day today,” he said. “The team did a great job getting ready, the car doesn’t have a mark on it so it’s just a little maintenance before the next race. I’m excited to head to Montreal.”

David Thorndyke and the EVT Chevrolet team will return to action next August 17 & 18 during the NASCAR Nationwide weekend at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal, QC.  For more NASCAR Canadian Tire Series information log onto www.nascar.ca and to learn more about the #67 Thorsons EVT Chevy team go to www.promotiveracing.com

July 25, 2012. Saskatoon, Sask. – Jarrad Whissell made big strides behind the wheel of his #44 Komatsu/SMS Ford on Wednesday at the Auto Clearing Motor Speedway despite his limited experience driving oval tracks and mechanical issues halting his qualifying laps.

The first practice session uncovered a problem with the upper control arm, but after making the repairs, Whissell and his crew were reasonably pleased with the times they were recording. However mechanical troubles plagued them again, as the #44 Komatsu/SMS Ford never completed a qualifying lap due to suspension issues again in the right front.

“The problem we had with the bracket in practice caused a failure during our qualifying run, and we broke the sway bar link,” Whissell said. “The guys did a great job to make the repairs and overcome the problem to get the car ready for the race.”

Whissell’s inability to qualify landed him at the back of the field for the main event later that day.

#44 took it easy in the early going of the race as he struggled to collect spots and pass his tough competitors. The long stretch of green and Whissell’s strained passing opportunities caused him to lose a lap early on.

Whissell’s car again showed some instability, when around the lap 80 it began to push. #44 forged on, making his scheduled stop for fuel and handling adjustments. On his second schedule stop, this time for tires, there was a miscue in the pits and Whissell fell behind another lap.

Luckily for #44 and his crew, the Komatsu/SMS Ford ran fast during the end of the race and made up for lost time. Despite losing two laps and the various mechanical issues that sprung up, #44 prevailed and made efforts to finish as strong as possible. Whissell crossed the finish line 11th, up 11 spots from his dead last, 22nd place start.

Jarrad Whissell will race next in the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series event during the NASCAR Nationwide weekend in Montreal August 17 & 18.  Follow the progress of the team and help support the Children’s Miracle Network through the team website www.jarradwhissell.com  You can also follow Jarrad on twitter, @JarradWhissell and also check out the team fan page on Facebook. Fans can watch all of the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series races again this year on TSN.

 

 

Dear Jessica,

We had a funny relationship. I remember when we found each other on Twitter last summer. You lamented over a jerk that texted you with bad grammar, and I knew immediately that we would be friends (I’ll learn to forgive you for being a proponent of Oxford commas).

I can’t help but read over and over the 591 Facebook messages we have back and forth and the last text you ever sent me. “Weird,” you said two days ago. Yeah, things are weird right now. You’re gone, and you were taken from this world in such a horrific way.

We never had the chance to meet in person, but with our lengthy chats over Twitter direct messages, Facebook emails and text messages, outsiders would think we shared a brain. We connected instantly over our mutual dreams of working in the National Hockey League and the struggles of being a young woman trying to break into such a difficult, male-driven industry. You handled every obstacle with such grace and respect for yourself. Not many women carry themselves in the same way.

It’s funny how social media works that way – Colorado is so far from Florida, but we still shared a long-distance bond over our intense passions and big plans for the future.

It wrecks me that we will never be able to produce our own beefed up version of female-centered NHL talk show While the Men Watch like we wanted or take that trip to Las Vegas that you insisted we should set up later this summer. “You only need to do two nights in Vegas if you do it right!” you told me.

Unfulfilled potential is heartbreaking. But the way your dynamic potential was ripped from you by the bullet of a stranger rocks me to the core in a disturbing and dark way. Your fierce ambition and motivation was so precious and rare. So much anger boils inside of me for the future you wanted so badly but now won’t get the chance.

But don’t worry, Jessica. I won’t give up on my passions – it’s fearless, firecracker women like you who pave the way for the rest of us.

With love and hockey sticks,

Caity

Grassroots social media campaign forms to protest NHL & NHLPA on Sept. 15th

When the last National Hockey League lockout began September 16, 2004, Twitter didn’t exist. Mark Zuckerberg was still enrolled at Harvard nursing an infant six-month-old Facebook while Tom Anderson ruled the budding social media industry as everyone’s first MySpace friend.

Eight years later, hockey fans once again anxiously await the Collective Bargaining Agreement negotiations battle to resolve before the September 15 deadline, fearing the second lockout in less than a decade.

However this time around, two fans have constructed digital picket signs to wave in front of NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, team owners and the NHL Player’s Association as they argue over percentages.

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